Review – Fluke 233 Remote Display True RMS Multimeter

Hello readers

Several followers of my website have noticed the use of an interesting multimeter in a few of my articles, and were curious about it. So in this article we will discuss it in more detail. It is certainly novel in design, and has proven to be very convenient in use – the Fluke 233 remote-display true RMS multimeter. It arrives in a cardboard box that is easily recycled:

Upon tearing open the packaging we are presented with the following contents:

The contents of the box are as follows:

  • The meter itself;
  • a long (~1.2m) pair of Cat IV leads with very sharp points;
  • matching insulated alligator clip adaptors;
  • a K-type thermocouple;
  • a printed Getting Started manual, and the complete manual on CDROM;
  • a single, universal getting started sheet – explains how to remove battery isolation tabs.

However, a carry case was not included. Considering the cost of the meter here (Au$550 + tax), one would have expected a case. On the other hand, if you/your workplace can afford a 233, you can pay for your own case. So there’s two angles to the case perspective.

It is good to see that there isn’t too much of a printer manual, the less paper used the better. As others have said, if you have one of these meters the manual isn’t necessary apart from checking the specifications, and the same applied to myself. Thoughtfully the meter is supplied and fitted with 5 x AA Duracell alkaline cells, three in the meter body and two in the display unit. All one needs to do is pull out the plastic tabs from the battery compartments, and you’re ready to go.

Physically the unit does not disappoint. Made in the USA. First class. Another solid Fluke design, clean lines, and a great fit and finish. Futhermore it is of a good weight, so you could always bang in a nail with it, or the pointy-head boss. The exterior has the rubber-moulded housing which is not removable, however this would be recommended for the target market – as the 233 would be more of a field work than a test-bench instrument. However, if you do sit it on the bench with the tilting bail, you can still operate it with one hand as it has enough friction to stay put. It is also good to see that the box and packaging are cardboard which is easily recycled.

After flicking the meter on the first thing to do was remove the display, plug in the thermocouple, and toss the body into the freezer:

Even with the meter in the freezer, I could still move the display around 1.5 meters away and it still received the data signal. Notice how the display is on the freezer door – it is magnetic. Immediately the benefits of the remote display come to mind. You can always have the display right where youwant it, and the meter where it needs to be… it’s win-win. After showing it to my auto-electrician friend, she didn’t want to give it back. The ability to set up a meter in a less than perfectly safe environment and take the display away is almost priceless. Furthermore, the backlight is a nice even blueish colour, and times out after around forty seconds.

Whilst in the kitchen, I tested out the external temperature of my tea:

Using the meter in general is very simple, you can hold it in one hand and select all of the functions with your thumb. Having the yellow shift key makes changing between associated readings very simple, for example after reading AC voltage:

Then pressing the shift key changes to frequency:

The meter has several useful indication functions – while working with high voltages the triangular market is illuminated; when changing to temperature you are prompted with “OPEN” for the thermocouple, and changing to current you are prompted with “LEAD” to change sockets. It is obvious after a short period of time this was designed by engineers for engineers, and not made to a ‘price’. Although this is not an electronics multimeter, it still has quite a few ranges that would suit at a pinch. Plus the one-touch data hold, minimum and maximum functions are included as with other top-end Flukes. Hopefully someone at Fluke is working on a remote display version of their 87V.

Now that I have had this meter for just over five months, it has already become a worthwhile addition to my bench. For the kind of work I do, it has already replaced another multimeter, my old frequency counter and thermometer. The ranges are quite useful, and the continuity beeper is in the display not the body. According to the manual the 233 is rated for a one meter drop onto any of the six surfaces. Out of respect to the meter I will not throw it into a river or from a moving car. The other factor that prevents me from going to such extremes is the clear plastic over the LCD – there is a small amount of ‘give’ or flexibility in that area. Otherwise the 233 is as solid as they come.

The specifications can be found in detail in the manual here, however a quick glance shows:

Range                                                             Accuracy

AC voltage: 0.1mV ~ 1000V                      1~2%+3

AC current: 1mA ~ 10A                               1.5%+3

DC voltage: 0.1mV ~ 1000V                     0.25%+2

DC current: 1mA ~ 10A                               1.0%+3 ** no microamperes

resistance: 0.1 ~ 40 meg-ohm                   0.9~1.5%+2

frequency:  0.01 Hz ~ 50 kHz                    0.1%+2

capacitance: 1nF to 9999 uF                     1.9%+2

temperature: -40 ~ 400 degrees Celsius     1%+10

And there is also a diode test and continuity beeper function. Interestingly enough, I discovered by accident that the frequency counter function was slightly underrated. Some more testing showed it was good for up to 99.48 kHz:

Not bad at all. However as with the many pros, there are  a few cons to using this meter. The auto-zero time of the display is a little slow, sometimes it can take two seconds. That doesn’t sound like much, but when you’re measuring many components the time adds up. And the LCD is not protected as well as expected, you can push into it with your finger. For a Fluke meter, one would expect it to be much more solid – if the display unit fell from a height and landed on something pointy with the display facing down, it would be ruined. So be careful if you have one. Furthermore, the battery life is around eight to ten weeks of “daily use” (perhaps seven hours a week, usually with the backlight on). Some have said this is bad, however my opinion is that the convenience of the remote display makes up for the shorter battery life.

However at the end of the day – this is a great tool. Being able to measure something outside your field of vision, and having the results in front of you is incredibly useful. You could achieve the same functions by using a meter with a PC interface, but that can be overkill and time-consuming to set up. So if the specifications of the 233 meet your needs, this is a great tool that will serve you very well.

The Fluke 233 Remote Display True RMS Multimeter is available from your local element-14 (previously Farnell) or Fluke distributor.

As always, thank you for reading and I look forward to your comments and so on. Furthermore, don’t be shy in pointing out errors or places that could use improvement. Please subscribe using one of the methods at the top-right of this web page to receive updates on new posts. Or join our Google Group.

[Disclaimer – the Fluke 233 is a review sample made available by Fluke via element-14]

Otherwise, have fun, be good to each other – and make something! :)

 

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By John Boxall

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